It's True: Republican Partners Give Female Associates Smaller Bonuses

If you're worried about gender equality in Big Law, perhaps you should discreetly inquire about your boss's political sympathies.

, The Am Law Daily

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If you're worried about gender equality in Big Law, perhaps you should discreetly inquire about your boss's political sympathies.

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What's being said

  • Drucilla Ramey

    Karen Kaplowitz is correct. The subjectivity in question characterizes substantially all levels of decision-making in law firms, practices they presumably have advised their corporate clients to eschew owing to their vulnerability to bias, and, increasingly, to legal challenge. Taken in conjunction with the gender-skewed systems of compensation credit allocation employed by many large firms, particularly with respect to so-called "origination credit," it is not surprising that, as recently reported by Major, Lindsey & Africa, women equity partners‘ compensation is 44% lower than that of their male counterparts. Though less extensively studied, the reported experiences of minority lawyers are substantially similar. It is no wonder that, as noted in the Washington Post, law is the least diverse profession in the nation.

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