Litigator of the Week: Stephen Tillery of Korein Tillery

, The Litigation Daily

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It's more than a little unusual for an intermediate court to undo a high court decision. But Tillery's $10 billion battle with Philip Morris is no ordinary case.

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  • Darren McKinney

    "More than a little unusual for an intermediate court to undo a high court decision"? That‘s an understatement if ever there was one. This appellate decision is a nonsensical travesty, pure and simple.

    Not that such decisions are rare in Southwestern Illinois, where the judiciary has notoriously and shamelessly been in bed with the parasitic plaintiffs‘ bar for decades. And the Fifth District appellate justices in this case, along with the now retired original trial judge, collectively comprise a particular disgrace.

    As for Mr. Tillery: if "Chutzpah" magazine were to cite him as Litigator of the Week, I‘d get it. But for Litigation Daily to do so borders on ludicrous. And hereby willing to bet anyone reading this that Illinois‘ high court will reverse this absurd appellate decision, I confidently predict that Mr. Tillery will ultimately be left only with the option of bringing a new case if he chooses. But any dreams he may have of another corrupted $10 billion verdict are wholly delusional.

    -Darren McKinney, American Tort Reform Association, Washington, D.C.

  • Darren McKinney

    "More than a little unusual for an intermediate court to undo a high court decision"? That‘s an understatement if ever there was one. This appellate decision is a nonsensical travesty, pure and simple.

    Not that such decisions are rare in Southwestern Illinois, where the judiciary has notoriously and shamelessly been in bed with the parasitic plaintiffs‘ bar for decades. And the Fifth District appellate justices in this case, along with the now retired original trial judge, collectively comprise a particular disgrace.

    As for Mr. Tillery: if "Chutzpah" magazine were to cite him as Litigator of the Week, I‘d get it. But for Litigation Daily to do so borders on ludicrous. And hereby willing to bet anyone reading this that Illinois‘ high court will reverse this absurd appellate decision, I confidently predict that Mr. Tillery will ultimately be left only with the option of bringing a new case if he chooses. But any dreams he may have of another corrupted $10 billion verdict are wholly delusional.

    -Darren McKinney, American Tort Reform Association, Washington, D.C.

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