, The Careerist

The Careerist: Lawyer Depression Begins Early

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Lawyers have one of the highest proportions of suicides among all occupations—and the bar admissions vetting process could be making the situation even worse.

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What's being said

  • Marjorie Silver

    Not only are bar associations not catching on quickly enough, New York has moved backwards, recently adding intrusive and likely illegal questions to the current bar application, without any opportunity for the LAP community to comment.

  • not available

    The most prevalent mental illness among lawyers, as among the general population, is addiction, specifically alcoholism.

    Alcoholism, like all addictions, is a chronic, progressive brain disease. It‘s treatable. Perhaps not as successfully as one might like, but on a par with other chronic diseases that require substantial behavioral change, like diabetes and hypertension.
    Unfortunately, many people still don‘t believe addiction is a disease. That‘s why science-based education is so important.
    For a not-for-profit website that discusses the science of substance use and abuse in accessible English (how alcohol and drugs work in the brain; how addiction develops; why addiction is a chronic, progressive brain disease; what parts of the brain malfunction as a result of substance abuse; how that malfunction skews decision-making and motivation, resulting in addict behaviors; why some get addicted while others don‘t; how treatment works; how well treatment works; why relapse is common; what family and friends can do; etc.) please click on www.AddictScience.com.

  • not available

    Good article. However, I think that a common sense view would hold that their is just not enough leisure time for folks in the legal community to lead balanced lives.

    Back in the day, a young associate could be counted on a regular basis for a game of tennis, a round of golf, a spirited regatta with senior partners and clients. No more!

    Add to that the added complexities of both spouses working... Well, I think it is quite obvious...

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