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The Untold Story Behind Big Law Mergers: Revenue Slips, Costs Rise

, The Am Law Daily

   | 2 Comments

Attention, partners and Big Law leaders at newly formed mega-firms. Not to interrupt your post-merger glow, but a report released Wednesday by ALM Intelligence states that most major law firm combinations since 2000 have not resulted in significant growth.

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What's being said

  • Marcus Ollig

    We see this in our work with large and small law firm all of the time. As mentioned above, adding to core strengths is key, but so is understanding your firm culture and its cultural strengths and weaknesses. Work to understand if a potential merger partner shares this attributes and values. 80% of lateral attorney moves also end in failure - because of the same lack of focus on culture and people‘s traits.

  • RMF

    There is an old saying. "You can‘t make a silk purse out of a sow‘s ear." That is especially true of two sows‘ ears. If one or both of the firms were not in financial difficulties, they would not have contemplated mergers in the first place.

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